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Curated by Kidada Williams (@profkew) and Jessica Marie Johnson (@jmjafrx)
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The Codex, Vol. I of III

September 20, 2014 at 4:30pm

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Reblogged from jmjafrx

XIX. And for a further prevention of that abominable mixture and spurious issue, which hereafter may increase in this her majesty’s colony and dominion, as well by English, and other white men and women intermarrying with negros or mulattos, as by their unlawful condition with them, Be it enacted, by the authority aforesaid, and it is hereby enacted, That whatsoever English, or other white man or woman, being free, shall intermarry with a negro or mulatto man or woman, bond or free, shall, by judgment of the county court, be committed to prison, and there remain, during the space of six months, without bail or mainprize; and shall forfeit and pay ten pounds current money of Virginia, to the use of the parish, as aforesaid.

— Virginia, October 1705 – Selections from “An Act Concerning Servants and Slaves” (via jmjafrx)

3:01pm

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Reblogged from jmjafrx

XXIV. Provided, That when any negro, or other runaway, that doth not speak English, and cannot, or through obstinacy will not, declare the name of his or her masters or owner, that then it shall be sufficient for the said justice to certify the same, instead of the name of such runaway, and the proper name and surname of his or her master or owner, and the county of his or her residence and distance of miles, as aforesaid; and in such case, shall, by his warrant, order the said runaway to be conveyed to the public gaol, of this country, there to be continued prisoner until the master or owner shall be known; who, upon paying the charges of the imprisonment, or give caution to the prison-keeper for the same, together with the reward of two hundred or one hundred pounds of tobacco, as the case shall be, shall have the said runaway restored.

— Virginia, October 1705 – Selections from “An Act Concerning Servants and Slaves” (via jmjafrx)

1:30pm

3 notes
Reblogged from jmjafrx

XXXVI. And also it is hereby enacted and declared, That baptism of slaves doth not exempt them from bondage; and that all children shall be bond or free, according to the condition of their mothers, and the particular directions of this act.

— Virginia, October 1705 – Selections from “An Act Concerning Servants and Slaves” (via jmjafrx)

12:01pm

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Reblogged from jmjafrx
jmjafrx:

July 9, 1640 - Punishment for Runaway Servants
“Whereas Hugh Gwyn hath by order from this Board Brought back from Maryland three servants formerly run away from the said Gwyn, the court doth therefore order that the said three servants shall receive the punishment of whipping and to have thirty stripes apiece one called Victor, a dutchman, the other a Scotchman called James Gregory, shall first serve out their times with their master according to their Indentures, and one whole year apiece after the time of their service is Expired. By their said Indentures in recompense of his Loss sustained by their absence and after that service to their said master is Expired to serve the colony for three whole years apiece, and that the third being a negro named John Punch shall serve his said master or his assigns for the time of his natural Life here or elsewhere.”
Source: McIlwaine, ed., Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, p. 466.

jmjafrx:

July 9, 1640 - Punishment for Runaway Servants

“Whereas Hugh Gwyn hath by order from this Board Brought back from Maryland three servants formerly run away from the said Gwyn, the court doth therefore order that the said three servants shall receive the punishment of whipping and to have thirty stripes apiece one called Victor, a dutchman, the other a Scotchman called James Gregory, shall first serve out their times with their master according to their Indentures, and one whole year apiece after the time of their service is Expired. By their said Indentures in recompense of his Loss sustained by their absence and after that service to their said master is Expired to serve the colony for three whole years apiece, and that the third being a negro named John Punch shall serve his said master or his assigns for the time of his natural Life here or elsewhere.”

Source: McIlwaine, ed., Minutes of the Council and General Court of Colonial Virginia, p. 466.

11:33am

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Reblogged from profkew
profkew:

Exhibit: Voyage of the Echo: The Trials of an Illegal Trans-Atlantic Slave Ship

This online exhibition examines the illegal trans-Atlantic slave trade through the voyage and capture of the slave ship Echo in 1858. The Echo voyage demonstrates how port cities such as New York City and New Orleans were strongly tied to the slave trade long after the U.S. Abolition Act of 1807, and how the traffic profoundly affected debates about the future of U.S. slavery in the years immediately preceding the American Civil War. Published May 2014.

Click here for the exhibit.

profkew:

Exhibit: Voyage of the Echo: The Trials of an Illegal Trans-Atlantic Slave Ship

This online exhibition examines the illegal trans-Atlantic slave trade through the voyage and capture of the slave ship Echo in 1858. The Echo voyage demonstrates how port cities such as New York City and New Orleans were strongly tied to the slave trade long after the U.S. Abolition Act of 1807, and how the traffic profoundly affected debates about the future of U.S. slavery in the years immediately preceding the American Civil War. Published May 2014.

Click here for the exhibit.

11:32am

3 notes
"Group of African Negroes on Board The Niagara.—From a sketch by our own correspondent," Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, October 9, 1858, Charleston Museum Illustrated Newspapers Collection, courtesy of the Charleston Museum. After the Echo was intercepted by a U.S. anti-slave trade patrol, President James Buchanan ordered the Echo survivors to be sent from Charleston to Liberia on the U.S.S. Niagara.
Source: Lowcountry Digital History Initiative: Voyage of the Echo

"Group of African Negroes on Board The Niagara.—From a sketch by our own correspondent," Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, October 9, 1858, Charleston Museum Illustrated Newspapers Collection, courtesy of the Charleston Museum. After the Echo was intercepted by a U.S. anti-slave trade patrol, President James Buchanan ordered the Echo survivors to be sent from Charleston to Liberia on the U.S.S. Niagara.

Source: Lowcountry Digital History Initiative: Voyage of the Echo

10:30am

3 notes
Reblogged from jmjafrx

Colonialism is an act of conquest or domination by one state over another forged through violence.

— Hilary Jones, The Métis of Senegal, 6 (via jmjafrx)

10:02am

3 notes

Legal History Blog: A Conference on "the Antislavery Origins of the Civil War" →

"Bringing together the best new scholarship in the field, “The Antislavery Bulwark: The Antislavery Origins of the Civil War” points toward an important new way of thinking about the origins of the Civil War. The conference considers how the activities of antislavery Americans ultimately contributed to Southern secession and war. It places less emphasis on the radical abolitionist “vanguard” than on the broader antislavery movement, especially antislavery politics, stressing the common objects and premises of an often divided crusade. The larger intellectual goal is to reaffirm the strength and significance of antislavery politics in the early national and antebellum eras. Topics include the origins and significance of the Somerset case, the legal and political ramifications of the “first emancipation,” and antislavery politics in the new nation from the Missouri Crisis to the fugitive slave crisis of the 1850s and the election of 1860. Keynote address by David Blight…."

9:26am

15 notes
And Endlessly, I Create Myself: William Adjété Wilson and The Black Ocean

Hours: Tuesday - 1 to 5 PM  | Wednesday - 1 to 4 PM | Thursday - 4 to 8 PM

William Adjété Wilson is a French-Togolese artist whose work imaginatively refashions classic techniques and materials used by African artisans. His often-colorful visual narratives, informed by individual biographies, family stories and collective histories, present a provocative critique of complicated encounters between Africa and Europe over the last 500 years.

Born in France, Wilson had little knowledge of his Togolese father’s family until he traveled through the Gulf of Guinea as a young man. Though trained as a philosopher and anthropologist, this journey inspired him to pursue an artistic practice. His work has been shown throughout Africa, Europe, the U.S. and Brazil.

Wilson’s intellectual interests continue to inform his creative work, which both celebrates and interrogates the often untold stories of the African continent. Black Ocean, a collaboration between Wilson and a workshop of artisans in the Republic of Benin, is a series of powerful appliqué textiles which bear witness to the richness of West African cultures and the complex histories that weave together people of Africa, Europe and the Americas.  Through this important work, Wilson places himself intellectually and spiritually in conversation with his European and African ancestors.



(via GalleryDAAS | Department of Afroamerican and African Studies | University of Michigan)

And Endlessly, I Create Myself: William Adjété Wilson and The Black Ocean

Hours: Tuesday - 1 to 5 PM | Wednesday - 1 to 4 PM | Thursday - 4 to 8 PM

William Adjété Wilson is a French-Togolese artist whose work imaginatively refashions classic techniques and materials used by African artisans. His often-colorful visual narratives, informed by individual biographies, family stories and collective histories, present a provocative critique of complicated encounters between Africa and Europe over the last 500 years.

Born in France, Wilson had little knowledge of his Togolese father’s family until he traveled through the Gulf of Guinea as a young man. Though trained as a philosopher and anthropologist, this journey inspired him to pursue an artistic practice. His work has been shown throughout Africa, Europe, the U.S. and Brazil.

Wilson’s intellectual interests continue to inform his creative work, which both celebrates and interrogates the often untold stories of the African continent. Black Ocean, a collaboration between Wilson and a workshop of artisans in the Republic of Benin, is a series of powerful appliqué textiles which bear witness to the richness of West African cultures and the complex histories that weave together people of Africa, Europe and the Americas. Through this important work, Wilson places himself intellectually and spiritually in conversation with his European and African ancestors.

(via GalleryDAAS | Department of Afroamerican and African Studies | University of Michigan)

9:21am

9 notes
Sara Forbes Bonetta was captured aged five by slave raiders in west Africa, rescued by Captain Frederick E Forbes, then presented as a ‘gift’ to Queen Victoria.

Photograph: Courtesy of Paul Frecker collection/The Library of Nineteenth-Century Photography.

(via Hidden histories: the first black people photographed in Britain – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian)

Sara Forbes Bonetta was captured aged five by slave raiders in west Africa, rescued by Captain Frederick E Forbes, then presented as a ‘gift’ to Queen Victoria.

Photograph: Courtesy of Paul Frecker collection/The Library of Nineteenth-Century Photography.

(via Hidden histories: the first black people photographed in Britain – in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian)